Tuesday, April 4, 2017

What Do You Want to Write? (Part 4 of 5)

If you have a narrow focus, be careful. Once you start publishing books in one genre, you’re branded. If you’re a novelist, it’s difficult to move into nonfiction. Your fan base stays with you because you write in the area where they want to read. If you switch, they probably won’t, and it means starting over again.

When I think along that line, I remember our years living in rural Kenya. During the long rains (when it rained day and night), the only way we could travel was to pick a rut and stay with it because our tires sank several inches. Trying to get out of that mired track often meant being stuck and unable to move in any direction.

That’s how I think of specialized writing. It’s easy to follow the same rut, if you enjoy it. Before I specialized in ghostwriting, I wrote articles on marriage—a lot of them—and one publisher asked me to write The Encyclopedia of Christian Marriage, which I did. Afterward, I decided I wanted out of that field.

I chose to generalize as early as 1980, knowing that it would be difficult or nearly impossible to sell in more than one genre. Even now, I make my living as a ghostwriter/collaborator. I write in other nonfiction fields, but none of them sell as well. My brand, my public identity, comes from my specialized field.

If you want to be a successful author, 
choose your rut.

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Are you interested in ghostwriting or collaborating and don't know where to start? Check out Cec's new book, Ghostwriting: The Murphey Method. It'll answer your questions and get you on the right track.

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