Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Waiting (Part 1 of 4)

This post is by Steve Laube and is reprinted with his permission.

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Good publishing takes time. Time to write well. Time to edit well. Time to find the right agent. Time to find the right publisher. Time to edit again and re-write. Time to design well. Time to market well.

While there can be a lot of activity, it still feels like “time” is another word for “wait.” No one likes to wait for anything. Our instant society (everything from Twitter to a drive-thru burger) is training us to want things to happen faster. Business experts claim faster is better (see Charles Duhigg’s book on productivity Smarter, Faster, Better). Many years ago I wrote about how long it takes to get published, which gave an honest appraisal of the time involved in traditional publishing. Reviewing that post from half a decade ago reveals that nothing has changed!

A successful author learns how to wait well.

Waiting for the Agent

Why can’t agents respond faster? Don’t we just sit around all day and read? We try our best to reply to submissions within eight weeks and are relatively good about that. But if your project passes the first review stage and we are now reviewing your entire manuscript, remember that reading a full manuscript is much more demanding than reading a few pages in a proposal.

If you are already represented, all I can say is that agents do their best to be responsive to your questions and phone calls. Crisis Management is part of our job description. Remember that one of the first things a First Responder must do is triage. Some issues are more critical than others, which can create consternation if yours is next in line instead of first.

But if your agent is unresponsive that is a conversation for another blog post.


—Steve Laube is a literary agent and owner of Christian Writers Institute. http://www.stevelaube.com/

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Are you interested in ghostwriting or collaborative writing? Cec's newest book for writers--Ghostwriting: The Murphey Method--is now available for preorder.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

10 Marketing Do's and Don'ts for the Year (Part 3 of 3)

--By Rob Eagar (used with his permission)

8. Don’t Burn Yourself Out
The typical author, business owner, and non-profit director works a tireless schedule. Downtime can get pushed to the backburner, which leads to exhaustion, stress, and lowered creativity. Plan vacations now and make them sacrosanct. You’ll face this year feeling more relaxed knowing a vacation is on the books.

9. Do Pursue Bulk Sales
Bulk sales provide more revenue with less effort. For example, if you speak at conferences, encourage the director to buy your book for every attendee. Provide volume discounts as the quantity goes up, or create a special version of your product unique to the customer, such as custom covers, exclusive content, bonuses, etc.

10. Don’t Skip Your Professional Growth
Don’t view professional development or hiring outside expertise as an expense. View it as investing money today to make more money tomorrow. But, only take advice from someone who has succeeded at achieving your intended goal. If you want to increase your business acumen, you must increase your skills.

As you read these 10 Marketing Do’s and Don’ts, pick two or three issues and work on them this week.


Rob Eagar is the founder of WildFire Marketing and a broad-based marketing consultant who helps authors, publishers, and organizations spread their message like wildfire. http://www.startawildfire.com/