Tuesday, March 13, 2018

The Book Hook Hall of Fame (Part 1 of 2)

As I finished creating my 10-part series on writing aphorisms, I read marketing consultant Rob Eagar’s blog, “Wildfire Marketing.” The next two posts are reprinted with his permission. (Cec)

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What if you could convince people to buy your book with just one sentence?

Would you want to learn how? Of course, every author would be curious to know the answer.

That's the power of a hook. And it just worked on you. (Ha!)

A book hook is a statement or question designed to generate immediate curiosity and make the reader desire to know more.

Why are hooks so important? Language is the power of the book sale. You're not selling books to machines. You're selling books to human beings. A book hook is powerful language that naturally makes people notice and want more.

How do you create a great book hook? Use this simple technique to get started. Imagine that your book is about to become a movie. Think like a screenwriter instead of an author.

For example, if you write fiction, picture your novel as an upcoming major motion picture, such as a thriller, a romantic comedy, or a horror film. How would you grab the reader's attention in one sentence?

If you've written a memoir, imagine your book as a dramatic tale on the silver screen. How would you make people curious about your story using one question or statement? If your genre is non-fiction history, education, religion, or self-help, imagine your book as a feature documentary.

Another effective technique for a great book hook is related to the way ESPN promotes their popular sports documentaries on TV called "30 for 30." They market every film using a narrator who asks the question, "What if I told you ____?" For each documentary, they fill in the blank to that question with a provocative statement.

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