Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Why It's Okay to Lose a Contest (Part 1 of 2)

Tamela Hancock Murray, an agent with The Steve Laube Agency, wrote this article. It's used with her permission.

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Any author who’s entered contests knows that they are difficult to win. The competition is more fierce than ever. For example, I just judged an ACFW competition and would have been happy to represent most of the authors whose work I reviewed. Entries get better every year. This is good news for readers while encouraging authors to fine tune their work. In the case of prestigious contests such as those sponsored by ACFW, there are no losers. I had the privilege of attending the Christy Award dinner on several occasions. Again, there are no losers in any group of Christy finalists.

There are other reasons not to be depressed if you lose a contest:

1.) Judges have subjective opinions. Their views are valuable, and feedback — even if it’s just a perfect score — is worthwhile. But as with any other sentiments, it’s up to the author to decide which comments to take to heart.

2.) Not all contests are created equal. Some coordinators have a pool of more appropriate judges than others. I’ve been asked to judge contests where my credentials made sense. I’ve also been asked to rank submissions where the poor coordinator plainly reached out to me in desperation. What does this mean for authors? Consider all opinions, but don’t stress.

(We’ll cover two more reasons in next week’s post.)

2 comments:

  1. I like these reminders a lot. The trick with any type of appetite (reading or eating) is that everyone has an opinion on what's good! And sometimes, the more you know, the more opinionated you can be.

    But any reader's opinion can be so helpful for fine-tuning characters. If one person feels a certain way, it's likely others will too.

    I particularly love any contest that promises feedback for every entry. To me, the feedback is one of the best prizes that I could "win." :)

    ReplyDelete

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